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Common myths and facts about mental illness

Wednesday, March 21st, 2018 | Blog
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Mental health problems can affect anyone at any point in their life, however mental health is a complex issue and it is easy to feel confused and unclear about it’s impact. We’ve shared the most common misconceptions about mental illness to help distinguish between the myths and facts about mental illness.

Myth

Mental health problems are rare.

Fact

Mental health problems are actually more common than most of us believe. It is estimated that 1 in 4 people in the UK experience a mental health problem each year.

Myth

People with mental health problems are violent and unpredictable.

Fact

Most people with mental illness are not violent and only 3%–5% of violent acts can be attributed to individuals living with a serious mental illness. You probably know people with mental health problems and don't realise it, as many people with mental health problems are active and productive members of our communities.

Myth

People suffering with a mental health illness can’t work.

Fact

Workplaces are filled with people who have experienced or are suffering from mental health problems. Having a mental health illness doesn’t mean that someone is no longer capable of working. In fact, around 15% of people in the workplace are experiencing a mental health illness and it is estimated that women in employment are twice as likely to have a mental health problem compared to men.

Myth

People can’t recover from mental illness.

Fact

Most experiences of mental health illness are likely to be short term and people do recover. There are many different treatments, services and support available today to help people manage and control their mental health symptoms. No one should feel they will be unwell forever, with the right treatment anyone can recover from a mental health illness and go on the lead a normal life.

Myth

I can’t do anything to help.

Fact

It can be hard to know what you can do to help, but friends and loved ones can make a huge difference to help someone suffering with a mental health illness. Don’t be afraid to talk openly and ask how they are feeling. This small gesture can go long way in making the person feel more open to talk about their mental health if they know there is somebody willing to listen to them.

If you have concerns about your mental health, visit your GP who will provide professional advice on how to manage your symptoms.



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